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Archive for the ‘Articles’ Category

http://www.naturalnews.com/022313_fat_oil_coconut.html

Introduction to the Newsletter

The aims of this newsletter are two fold. The first is to provide you with information, and my interpretations, on how to improve body composition and increase performance. Secondly I want the contents of the newsletter to stimulate your thinking processes while at the same time give you enough information to work with so you can make up your own mind on the various topics we cover.
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Introduction to the Newsletter

This newsletter is for the elite athlete looking to maximize body composition and athletic performance. In it I’ll present information that will help you accomplish that along with explaining how it all ties in with the MD+ line of nutritional supplements, which were formulated by listening to all of the relevant scientific and medical studies, and combining this information with my over four decades in the trenches experience dealing with athletic performance enhancement.

http://eliteperformancenewsletter.com/sites/eliteperformancenewsletter.com/files/elite_1-1.pdf

Below are some key points of interest I’ve noted with respect to the article entitled “Fructose, Insulin Resistance, and Metabolic Dyslipidemia”

  • A high flux of fructose to the liver, the main organ capable of metabolizing this simple carbohydrate, perturbs glucose metabolism and glucose uptake pathways, and leads to a significantly enhanced rate of de novo lipogenesis and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, driven by the high flux of glycerol and acyl portions of TG molecules from fructose catabolism.
  • The epidemic of type 2 diabetes is complicated by the fact that it is a multi-factorial disease, frequently associated with a cluster of pathologies including obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance, collectively referred to as the metabolic syndrome (formerly known as syndrome X and insulin resistance syndrome)

Protein Hydrolysates In Sports Nutrition

April 25th, 2010  |  CATEGORY: Articles

Anssi H Manninen

Manninen Nutraceuticals Oy, Hajottamotie 11, 90550 Oulu, Finland

author email corresponding author email

Nutrition & Metabolism 2009, 6:38doi:10.1186/1743-7075-6-38

The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/6/1/38

Received: 16 July 2009
Accepted: 28 September 2009
Published: 28 September 2009

© 2009 Manninen; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

It has been suggested that protein hydrolysates providing mainly di- and tripeptides are superior to intact (whole) proteins and free amino acids in terms of skeletal muscle protein anabolism. This review provides a critical examination of protein hydrolysate studies conducted in healthy humans with special reference to sports nutrition. The effects of protein hydrolysate ingestion on blood amino acid levels, muscle protein anabolism, body composition, exercise performance and muscle glycogen resynthesis are discussed.

Introduction

Proteins and amino acids are an important part of a diet, and as such, have been the subject of a great deal of discussion and controversy, especially among strength/power athletes. More than 15 y ago some bodybuilding magazines suggested that protein hydrolysates providing mainly di- and tripeptides are superior to intact (whole) proteins and free amino acids in terms of skeletal muscle protein anabolism.
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